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My Beautiful New Guitar…and Why I’m Putting it Away

Posted by on Feb 25, 2019

My Beautiful New Guitar…and Why I’m Putting it Away

I’ve been sitting on this story for a couple months now and finally finding the moment to share it. The timing is interesting because Lent is approaching…but more on that later.

It was a sunny, crisp Southern California day in November. My friend Pete and I were driving up the coast toward Ventura, excited to be extended an invite to Larrivee Guitar‘s “Friends and Family Day” at the factory. I was imagining a huge crowd and the slight possibility of not even being able to get in, but God seemed to have parted the waters because when we arrived the place was empty.

We were greeted by the small team of guitar builders and waisted no time in getting down to the business of talking through what we were interested in seeing and what kind of guitars might be lying around for a steal. I’d been on the lookout for a new guitar for about a year, but I really wasn’t sure what I was really searching for. I wanted a story, mainly. I wanted an experience, not just a guitar from a music store’s crowded walls. There was a big, beautiful SD-60 up for sale that had been Larrivee’s flagship factory guitar for many years, and Pete fell in love with it right away. It sounded deep and rich, with years of loving play wear, but the neck was a bit thick for me.

What I really started to gravitate toward was the smaller, 12th fret 000-60. The new model had a slimmer neck, and this smaller body shape was just perfect. Problem was, there weren’t any of these available in the factory that day. Pete pressed the Larrivée guys a bit for a sample, and well, after a bit of digging, there was actually one, lonely, 000-60 up in the racks, but it wasn’t completed yet. It was about 85% done and still needed some final touches. I held the partly finished, tape covered, dusty guitar in my hand, and knew; this was it.

Some lively discussion ensued about how and when the guitar could be ready to take home. We offered to buy lunch for the technical team if they’d do it right then, but that was met with some reservation. Just when it looked like the whole idea might not happen at all, up walks the man himself, Mr. Jean Larrivée; the patriarch, the inventor, the master-builder. His quick walk, jolly face, and upbeat tone hid the fact he’s been making guitars for over 50 years. He still had that Santa Clause like sparkle in his eye when he talked about the instruments, and he was innocently enthusiastic about my new-found love of the 000-60. He gave his team the nod that this guitar could be finished over lunch and even offered a personal tour of his factory in the meantime. Pete and I knew in a second this was a rare opportunity, one of those situations that may never come around again, and we all shook hands on the deal.

Here’s the shot of Mr. Larrivee and me with the never-before-played 000-60.

Hearing Jean’s stories as we walked the factory that day will be something I’ll never forget. Pete and I would just stare at each other from time to time, wanting to pinch ourselves – was this really happening? We marveled at the pallets of exotic woods from around the world, curing in stacks, the humidifier room where guitar bodies were resting in their new-formed shapes, and floored by the one-of-a-kind, ancient, handmade “machines” that automated some aspects of Jean’s guitar building.

There’s too much to list here (and some things we swore secrecy about), but a kaleidoscope of images will be forever burned into my memory. Everything about this experience was an overwhelming joy. I think God answered my prayer for a “story” and not just a guitar. At the end of the day, Jean posed one final time with me and the finished instrument. He said he didn’t sign them inside anymore (couldn’t get both his hand and a Sharpie into the sound hole very easily), but he graciously signed a custom label that I could put in later. How a craftsman continues to be so passionate and inspired after 50 years was beyond comprehension. He still comes into the factory almost every day to put his personal touches on each guitar.

I’ve been playing this amazing new instrument for a couple months now, and I can truly say it’s the most lavishly manufactured, quality sounding guitar I’ve ever held in my hands. I feel blessed every time I pick it up. But that’s the irony here; I’m sharing this story a couple weeks before Lent begins, and I’ve decided to put the Larrrivee away for the 6-week season ahead. Lent is a time of stripping away, a time to get in touch with our limitedness, and confess in honesty our brokenness and need for a Savior. To that end, our church will practice “A Cappella Sunday” on March 1oth, relying on our voices alone, taking us back to our roots, and my new, gorgeous 000-60 will stay tucked away in its case. It’ll be a few weeks before I play a guitar again on Sunday morning, and even then, in my own personal Lenten tradition, I’ll be lugging around my big, beat-up Hummingbird until Easter morning. But what a glorious Easter that will be…enhanced by the feeling of opening up that case and bringing out the Larrivee once again! Thank you, Jean!

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JFB sighting! June 9th!

Posted by on May 14, 2017

JFB sighting! June 9th!

We’re back! Pete Dawson on electric guitar will be joining the three of us, rounding out the classic JFB line-up on June 9th in Bellflower. We’ll be featuring a full-band set of original songs from over 20 years of music making. We’ll be focusing our song set around the theme of prayer and excited to revisit classics like “I Will” and “Stay”, as well as bring to life the newer songs “Here With You” and “In My Weakness”. There will be a couple other worship bands kicking off the night, and we’ll close the evening with a set starting at 8:30. Hope to see you there!

 

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WHY do we do this?

Posted by on Sep 28, 2016

WHY do we do this?

As Pastor of Worship at Grace Community Church in Seal Beach, I have the opportunity to plan our worship gatherings each week, working with a pastoral team and other creative collaborators. It’s a joy and a privilege and also a great challenge: How do we keep things fresh but also stay true to a liturgy (the “work of the people”) that helps us know God better and appropriately respond in worship? What elements need to be there each week, and which ones could we leave behind? WHY do we even do some of this stuff anyway??

Our Worship Community recently gathered to reflect on these questions, and here’s a few nuggets we discovered. This video also did a great job of prompting us to really look hard at what we do and why we do it…

Each of these liturgy elements below are activities we do fairly regularly, and the descriptions and reasons behind them are taken from The Worship Sourcebook and Desiring the Kingdom. We decided that each one, when done properly, helps us worship God in spirit and truth, and that they really do matter after all:

Call to Worship “An invitation to be human”

One function of the invitation is to express welcome and hospitality. We worship in the joyful context of our renewed relationship with God in Christ. These words may be spoken with a gesture of open embrace and a genuine smile to convey the warmth of God’s love.

Another function of the invitation is to call the community to the unique activity of worship. The primary activity of the worship service is for worshipers to participate in the gift exchange of worship itself, by hearing God’s Word, by offering prayers and praise, and by receiving spiritual nourishment offered at the Lord’s table. The call to worship establishes the unique purpose of the worship service and reinforces the “vertical dimension” of worship—an encounter between God and the gathered congregation.

 

Invocation “Utter dependence on God”

These petitions express longing for God as well as deep dependence and humility. Invocations acknowledge that the power in worship is a gift from God rather than a human accomplishment, and they explicitly confess that we approach God only through Christ.

The term invocation implies that the congregation invokes, or “calls upon,” God, but it should never be inferred that we are the ones to invite God into our presence, or that God’s presence with us depends on our invoking the Lord. God is present before we begin! Our prayers of invocation celebrate and acknowledge God’s presence; they don’t produce it.

 

Confession and Assurance of Pardon “Brokenness, Grace, Hope”

Our God longs for honesty and holiness within the promise-based relationship God has established with us in Christ. In a culture that avoids talk of sin and culpability, regular prayers of confession foster honesty and openness in our relationship with God. Just as a marriage cannot flourish without honest confession, so our mar- riage-like relationship with God cannot flourish unless we freely and honestly express all facets of our life: hopes, fears, sins, desires, thanksgiving, and praise.

The call to confession invites us to honest expression within the context of our covenant relationship with God. God’s grace comes to us, creating a relationship with us in Christ in which honesty about our sin is welcome and safe. We confess our sin not in order for God to forgive us but because God has forgiven us in Christ. The call to confession, therefore, is a word of grace like the assurance of pardon, not an exercise that shames us into confession.

 

Offering “Kingdom economics of gratitude”

The offering is a vital part of our response to God and God’s Word. It helps us connect our adoration for God with our life of discipleship. The money given at the offering is a token and symbol of our desire to devote our whole selves to God’s service in response to God’s loving faithfulness to us. It is symbolic of the many other gifts we should return to the Lord: time, possessions, talents, insights, and concern for others.

The word offering implies something freely given, something presented as a token of dedication or devotion. Everything we have is a gift from God, and our offerings are a way of acknowledging God as the giver. Take care not to refer to this act of worship as the “collection,” which can imply that it is gathering money to defray expenses. Quite the contrary—the purpose of the offering is to offer our firstfruits to God, to render to God a sacrifice of praise.

 

Sermon “Renarrating the World”

The reading and preaching of God’s Word stands at the center of worship and constitutes one of the privileged moments of worship. The words that introduce and respond to the reading and preaching of Scripture are important for helping the congregation to receive them both attentively and gratefully.

The Scriptures function as the script of the worshiping community, the story that narrates the identity of the people of God, the constitution of this baptismal city, and the fuel of the Christian imagination.

 

Communion “Supper with the King”

The Lord’s Supper is a physical, ritual action, mandated by Jesus, through which God acts to nourish, sustain, comfort, challenge, teach, and assure us. A richly symbolic act, the celebration of the Lord’s Supper nourishes our faith and stirs our imaginations to perceive the work of God and the contours of the gospel more clearly.

As the New Testament unfolds the meaning of the feast, it describes the Lord’s Supper as a single celebration that conveys several layers of meaning. First, the Lord’s Supper is a celebration of memory and hope. We remember all that God has done for us, especially in Christ. The Lord’s Supper is a thankful remembrance of the entire life and ministry of Christ: his participation in the creation of the world; his birth at Bethlehem; his teaching and miracles; his suffering, death, resurrection, and ascension; his sending of the Spirit; and his second coming and final reign. Significantly we remember not only the actual events (past and future), but especially how those events give us an identity, how they transform us and all creation.

 

Response & Benediction “The cultural mandate meets the great commission”

The close of a worship service depends a great deal on the theme and development of the particular service. Some services end in celebration, others in quiet contemplation. Some end in a confident call to discipleship, others in a quiet prayer for God’s comfort. It is important to give a congregation time to process in prayer and consider the unique way in which the Holy Spirit is speaking to them through the service.

The greeting from God at the beginning of a service and God’s blessing at the end of the service frame the entire worship liturgy. Just as we begin with God’s gracious invitation, so we end with God’s promise to always be with us. In the benediction the dialogue of worship shifts from the people’s response to God’s parting words. The words of benediction (a Latin word meaning “to speak well” or “to speak a good word”) are intended to bring a blessing.

 

Song “Hymning the language of the Kingdom”

Singing is a full-bodied action that activates the whole person – or at least more of the whole person than is affected by merely sitting and passively listening, or even reading and reciting texts. Singing is a mode of expression that seems to reside in our imagination more than other forms of discourse. Music gets “in” us in ways that other forms of discourse rarely do. A song gets absorbed into our imagination in a way that mere texts rarely do.

 

It was interesting to consider how the activity of singing and music itself doesn’t dictate our liturgy, or the order of it, but instead serves to enhance each of these important practices. Music serves the liturgy, the liturgy shouldn’t serve the music. Even though it’s so close to all of our hearts, we discussed music last for this very reason.

We even had group leaders line up, holding signs to designate their representative liturgical element, and we spent some time putting them in creative orders. Does it matter how these are put together? We realized that it truly does, and had a bit of fun with it, too!

img_1011-2It is truly miraculous how music plays a big part in our lives, how a song can get “into us” in the deepest of ways. Two members of our community shared examples of songs that have moved them profoundly, and since they come from very different spectrums, I thought it’d be educational and inspiring to link them here. Listen to them both and appreciate with us the diversity and creativity of God’s people!

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My Two Cents…

Posted by on Jul 11, 2013

My Two Cents…

A friend and fellow musician, Chris Bright, has put together an outstanding educational website.  He recently interviewed me for a short piece on songwriting and performance.  I hope it’s helpful for many!  Click on the image below to go straight to his site…and make sure to explore all the great stuff he’s got on there!  Way to go, Chris!!

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17 years of prayer

Posted by on Jul 3, 2013

17 years of prayer

Several pastors in Costa Mesa have been praying together for over 17 years! And last Sunday, one of their prayer requests was answered; hundreds gathered to worship from churches across the city for one, united expression of faith. They cancelled their Sunday morning services and showed up at the fairgrounds at 9am, ready to praise a God of unifying love and work together to bless our community in unprecedented ways. This was a game-changer!

Our musicians came from 4 different churches, and I led the worship with a friend who sang in Spanish. We created a unique blend of languages as diverse neighbors worshipped together like never before…

Two of our city’s pastors bilingually challenged the audience to action, and we closed the service with a time of prayer, repentance, and commitment. As people left, there were booths and information set up to find out more about ways to serve and love Costa Mesa.

Several city council members attended, and one left in tears.

GOD IS ON THE MOVE!!!

Your contribution and prayers for this ministry allow me to step into divine appointments like this one-
Thanks again for partnering with us!

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Hand Motions!

Posted by on May 27, 2013

Some of you may not know this, but I have been writing some children’s worship songs for David C. Cook’s TRU curriculum as a side project, and I just stumbled onto this video for one of them. This simple little tune I wrote has become a major theme song for the TRU material, and I couldn’t be more stoked! Some fun facts about this recording that are kinda cool; it features Crystal Lewis on vocals and… my personal hero on the drums Mr. Kenny Aronoff! Follow along for some healthy cardio…

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